Saturday, April 19, 2014
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Week of August 31

Monday, August 31

  1. WARM UP: SAT VOCABULARY
  2. Teach SOAPSTone using "LOU GHERIG SPEECH";
  3. Introduction to Puritanism (Show New World Video)

HW: Write an essay using SOAPSTone with Bradford's "Plymouth Plantation". Cite examples from the text to support each element

Tuesday, September 31

  1. WARM UP: SAT Unit I Vocabulary
  2. Group Discussion/Activity:  Combine information from last night's assignment into one presentation. Turn in by the end of class.

HW: Read "Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God" by Friday .

Wednesday, September 2

  1. WARM UP: SAT Unit I Vocabulary
  2. introduce Rhetorical Triangle and Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
  3. Read "We Can Give Parents a Break" and evaluate
  4. Group Discussion/Activity:  Read and analyze Einstein's Letter to Phyllis Wright.

HW: Read "Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God" by Friday

Thursday, September 3

  1. WARM UP: SAT Unit I
  2. Continue study of Rhetorical Triangle and Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
  3. Group Discussion/Activity:  Read "Why and When We Speak Spanish in Public" by Myriam Marquez

HW:  Finish "Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God by tomorrow.

Friday, September 4

  1. Warm Up: SAT Unit I (Must be finished and turned in today)
  2. Quiz:  Rhetorical Triangle, Ethos, Pathos, Logos and "Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God."
  3. Introduce:  Religion in Early America and Historical Background behind "Sinners"

HW:  Analyze "Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God" using Rhetorical Analysis Guide.  DUE TUESDAY.  ANSWERS MUST BE TYPED.


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Week of September 7

LESSON AND ASSIGNMENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED ON CLASS PACE, UNDERSTANDING, AND TEACHER DISCRETION.

"Reading usually precedes writing, and the impulse to write is almost always fired by reading.  Reading, the love of reading, is what makes you dream of becoming a writer." Susan Sontag

Monday, September 7

SCHOOL HOLIDAY

Tuesday, September 8

  1. Warm-Up:  SAT Vocabulary Unit 2 (Completing the Sentences)/ Check UNIT I Answers
  2. Discuss "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
  3. Discuss Dialectic Journal Style Analysis for Same Kind of Different as Me    
  4. Writing: Thesis Statement
  5. Begin DIDLS:  Discuss "diction" and begin group work and complete for homework if needed.

HW:  Complete rhetorical analysis of "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God."

Wednesday, September 9

  1. Warm-Up: SAT Vocabulary Unit 2 (Completing the Sentences)
  2. Turn in Rhetorical Analysis of "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God."
  3. Pass out Greek and Latin Roots Packet--Complete by next Monday for test on September 17
  4. Everything's an Argument:  Ethos
  5. Writing:  Eight Step Writing Model
  6. DIDLS: Discuss and turn in "Diction" work; introduce "Imagery"-- work in groups and complete for homework if needed.

Thursday, September 10

  1. Warm-Up: SAT Vocabulary Unit 2 (Choosing the Right Word)
  2. Everything's an Argument:  Logos
  3. Writing:  Eight Step Writing Model Continued
  4. DIDLS: Discuss and turn in "Imagery" work; introduce "details"--work in groups and complete for homework if needed.

Friday, September 11 (Lessons were modified due to Pep Rally Schedule)

  1. Warm-Up:  SAT Vocabulary Unit 2 (Syn/Ant)--DUE TODAY
  2. DIDLS:  Discuss and turn in "Details" work; introduce "Language"--work in groups and complete for homework if needed.
  3. Distribute AP Terms Packet and "AP Quick Reference" packet.
  4. Classification of Writing:  Elements of a Compare/Contrast Essay; Read "Grant and Lee"; and "Of Weirdoes and Eccentrics" by Pico Iyer
  5. Attacking the Prompt and Writing a Thesis

HW: TEST over SAT Vocabulary Units I & 2 next FRIDAY

  In 50 Essays. . .

Read "Introduction for Students: Active Reading, Critical Thinking, and the Writing Process" p. 1-15
Read "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell p.302 and "Beauty When the Other Dancer is Self" p.441
Annotate the text as you read.
Be prepared for a quiz over your reading on Monday.
 
(If you do not have 50 Essays, you can print the reading from our class website, but BUY the book over the weekend.)
 
Links to Readings:
 

Week of September 14

Please note:  Lesson plans are subject to change based on class pace, understanding and teacher discretion.

September 14/15

  1. Warm Up: Voice Lessons 
  2. Latin/Greek Roots Packet--TEST ON THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 24
  3. AP PACKET (This is your only copy.  If you lose it, an addition copy will cost 2.50)
  4. Evaluate Rhetorical Analysis of "Sinners"
  5. DIDLS:Language/Sentences
  6. Modes of Discourse:  Narrative Writing/Analysis from 50 Essays
  7. Give instructions for composing an effective personal narrative essay FIRST DRAFT OF ESSAY DUE FRIDAY

HW:  First draft of narrative essay due FRIDAY; Read and annotate Zora Neale Hurston, "How it feels to Be Colored Me" (p. 206) and Virginia Wolf "The Death of a Moth" (p. 467)(50 Essays):work on Latin/Greek Roots packet; continue outside reading/annotation

September 16/17

WEDNESDAY IS SCHOOL PICTURE DAY

  1. Warm-Up:  Voice Lessons
  2. DIDLS:  Language/Sentences
  3. Group Activity: Continue evaluating narrative and descriptive essays

HW:  Finish first draft of narrative essay for class on FRIDAY; work on Latin/Greek Roots packet; continue outside reading/annotation

September 18

  1. Warm Up:  Voice Lessons
  2. SAT Unit 1 & 2 Vocabulary Quiz
  3. Peer Editing:  Narrative Essay

HW:  Read and annotate Frederick Douglass "Learning to Read and Write" and Lars Eighner "On Dumpster Diving" from 50 Essays; prepare SECOND DRAFT OF personal narrative for TUESDAY; work on Latin/Greek Roots packet; continue outside reading/annotation

 


Week of September 21

LESSON AND ASSIGNMENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED ON CLASS PACE, UNDERSTANDING, AND TEACHER DISCRETION.

Monday, September 21

BEGIN SAT UNIT III VOCABULARY.  TEST OVER UNITS 1-3 ON FRIDAY.

  • Voice Lessons:  Diction
  • Dialectical Journal:  Style Analysis for Same Kind of Different as Me
    Modes of Discourse:  Process Analysis Essays
  • Group Style Analysis:  "Learning to Read and Write"
  • Grammar as Rhetoric and Style:  Pronouns

HW:  Complete grammar assignment; finish second draft of narrative

  Tuesday, September 22

  • Voice Lessons:  Imagery
  • Rhetorical Strategy: Style Analysis Strategies/Student Models
  • Group Discussion:  Individual Style Analysis of  "Dumpster Diving"
  • Grammar as Rhetoric and Style: Appositives 
  • Peer Editing:  Reviewing Personal Narrative SECOND draft.  FINAL DRAFT DUE FRIDAY

HW:  Complete grammar assignment; Complete style analysis worksheet for "Dumpster Diving"; work on final draft of narrative.

    Wednesday, September 23

  • Voice Lessons:  Details
  • Rhetorical Devices:  Tone, Diction, Hyperbole, Metaphor, Personification 
  • Rhetorical Strategy:  Style Analysis Strategies/Student Models
  • Group Style Analysis "Dumpster Diving" Continued

HW: Complete grammar assignment; complete final draft of narrative; Read Clinton's two speeches "I Have Lied" and annotate--noting author's tone based on audience

    Thursday, September 24

  • Voice Lessons: Syntax
  • Rhetorical Devices:  Irony, Detail, Metaphor, Symbol, Tone 
  • Rhetorical Strategy:  Audience, Persona, and Text
  • Rhetorical Analysis:  Style Analysis over Clinton's speeches

HW: Read and annotate JFK's Inaugural Address; Read "From Analysis to Essay:  Writing About Close Reading"

Friday, September 25

  • Voice Lessons:  Tone
  • Turn in Personal Narrative
  • Modes of Discourse:  Style Analysis/ Student Model
  • Group Discussion:  Analyzing Style in JFK's Inaugural Address (Questions)

HW:  Using the thesis from the reading or creating one of your own, write an essay analyzing the rhetorical strategies John F. Kennedy uses in his inaugural address to achieve his purpose.

Week of September 28

LESSON AND ASSIGNMENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED ON CLASS PACE, UNDERSTANDING, AND TEACHER DISCRETION.

NO SAT VOCABULARY HOMEWORK THIS WEEK.

Monday, September 28

  • Notes:  Nathaniel Hawthorn
  • Reading Schedule for The Scarlet Letter/Study guide
  • The AP Exam:  Introduction to the Rhetorical Analysis Essay

HW:  Read The Custom House, Chapters 1 & 2 and complete study guide questions in Reader Response Journal  You do not need to make a page for The Custom House chapter.

 

Tuesday, September 29

  • Review:  DIDLS--Tying Up the Loose Ends
  • The AP Exam:  Rhetorical Analysis Essay
  • Notes:  Style, Setting and Themes in The Scarlet Letter  
  • Group Discussion:  The Scarlet Letter

  HW:  Read Chapters 3-4 and complete study guide questions in Reader Response Journal ; BEGIN MEMORIZING TROPES AND SCHEMES FOR A TEST NEXT WEEK (BE ABLE TO IDENTIFY THEM IN A SENTENCE)

  Wednesday, September 30

  1. Warm-Up:  Voice Lessons (Imagery)
  2. Review:  DIDLS--Tying Up the Loose Ends Cont'd
  3. The AP Exam:  Rhetorical Analysis Essay
  4. Group Discussion:  The Scarlet Letter  

  HW:  Read Ch. 5-6 and complete study guide questions in Reader Response Journal

  Thursday, October 1

1.  Complete "Things to Say about Syntax" Handout.  We started this on Friday and it will be due Tuesday.

HW:  Read Ch. 7-8 and complete study guide questions in Reader Response Journal

 

Friday, October 2

  1. AP Rhetorical Analysis Timed Writing over The Scarlet Letter (You may use your notes on how to write a rhetorical analysis from earlier in the week.) We took this test on Thursday due to the Pep Rally Schedule.

  HW:  Read Chapters 9-10 and complete study guide questions in Reader Response Journal. MEMORIZE SCHEMES AND TROPES FOR A TEST NEXT WEEK. (BE ABLE TO IDENTIFY THEM IN A SENTENCE)  Answer questions over annotated speech of JFK located in Close Reading to Writing Analysis Handout.


Attachment:
 The Scarlet Letter
 
Week of October 5

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace, and/or understanding.

 DUE DATES (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

10/9   STYLE ANALYSIS OVER JFK SPEECH DUE

10/13   OUTSIDE READING JOURNAL DUE

10/14   BIBLICAL ALLUSIONS ASSIGNMENT DUE

10/20   READER RESPONSE JOURNAL DUE

TBA COMMON ASSESSMENT

 

Monday

  1. Turn in questions over JFK Inaugural speech (preparation for style analysis)
  2. Rhetorical Terms:  anaphora, asyndeton, antimetabole, anthesis (based on JFK Inaugural address)
  3. The Scarlet Letter:  Share Reader's Response journals
  4. The Scarlet Letter:  Group discussion and analysis

HW:  Continue working on Reader Response journal, finish questions over JFK speech, complete Syntax HO (due tomorrow)

 

Tuesday

  1. Warm-Up:  What is the effect of the scarlet letter on Hester? (Your answer needs to have a thesis statement and textual support)
  2.   Rhetorical Terms:  cumulative sentence, horative sentence, loose sentence
  3. Style Analysis:  JFK Inaugural Speech
  4. The Scarlet Letter:  Bloom's Taxonomy and Embedded Quotes (preparation for Inner/Outer Circle on Thursday)

HW:  Read and ANNOTATE Ch. 11-12 in The Scarlet Letter; continue Reader's Response journal; from Ch. 1-10, create THREE higher level questions related to the text for the discussion on Thursday

Wednesday

  1. Warm-Up:  Mark all of the descriptions of Pearl.  How does the narrator present Pearl and her relationship to her mother to the reader?  (Your answer needs to have a thesis statement and textual support)
  2. The Scarlet Letter:  Bloom's Taxonomy and Embedded Quotes (preparation for Inner/Outer Circle on Thursday Continued)
  3. Style Analysis:  JFK Inaugural Speech

HW:  Continue reading and ANNOTATING Ch. 11-12 in The Scarlet Letter; continue Reader's Response journal; begin writing style analysis over JFK's Inaugural Address; from Ch. 1-10, create THREE higher level questions related to the text for the discussion on Thursday

Thursday

  1. Warm-Up:  Explain Hester's argument concerning her rights to Pearl.  (Your answer needs to have a thesis statement and textual support)
  2. The Scarlet Letter:  Inner/Outer Circle Discussion

HW:  Complete style analysis over JFK's Inaugural Address.  Submit final copy TOMORROW.

Friday

  1. Turn in style analysis over JFK's Inaugural Address.
  2. AP Test Preparation
    • AP Scoring Guide
    • Scoring Sample Essays
    • Practice scoring timed writings

HW:  Read and ANNOTATE Ch. 13-14 in The Scarlet Letter; continue Reader's Response journal; find FIVE allusions in The Scarlet Letter (3 biblical allusions, 1 historical allusion, and 1 literary allusion). 

 

    THIS ASSIGNMENT IS DUE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14

 

 


Week of October 12

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace, and understanding.

 Monday, October 12

 NO SCHOOL TODAY!  ENJOY!

HW:  Read and ANNOTATE Ch. 13-14; continue Reader Response Journal; continue Biblical Allusions Assignment; wrap up Outside Reading Dialectical Journal

 

Tuesday, October 13

  1. Turn in Outside Reading Dialectical Journal
  2. Analyze literary devices in The Scarlet Letter
  3. The Scarlet Letter Group Projects (Presentations on Tuesday, October 20)

HW: Read and ANNOTATE Ch. 15-16; continue Reader Response Journal; write 3 questions for inner/outer circle discussion from Ch. 11-18 

Wednesday, October 14

  1. Turn in Biblical Allusions Assignment
  2. The Scarlet Letter:  Literary Devices
  3. The Scarlet Letter Group Projects

HW:  Read and ANNOTATE Ch. 17-18; continue Reader Response Journal

 

Thursday, October 15

  1. The Scarlet Letter Group Projects
  2. Inner/Outer Circle Discussion

HW:  Read and ANNOTATE Ch. 19-21; continue Reader Response Journal

Friday, October 16

  1. The Scarlet Letter Group Projects
  2. Discuss Nine Weeks Exam Expectations and Format

HW:  Read and ANNOTATE Ch. 23-24; finish Reader's Response Journal (DUE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20)

 

 

 

Week of October 19

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace, and understanding.

 Monday, October 19

  1. The Scarlet Letter:  Final Discussion Begins
  2. Group Presentation Wrap-Up--DUE TOMORROW

HW: Complete Reader Response Journal (if needed)--DUE TOMORROW 

Tuesday, October 20

  1. Turn in Reader Response Journal
  2. Group Presentations
  3. The Scarlet Letter--Final Discussion 

HW: NONE

Wednesday, October 21

  1. AP Language and Composition Nine Week Exam (Part I)

HW:  NONE

Thursday, October 22

  1. AP Language and Composition Nine Week Exam (Part II)

HW: NONE

Friday, October 23

  1. Overview of Second Nine Weeks
  2. Introduce Research Paper (Letter, Supplies, Overview)

HW:  NONE

Week of October 26

Lesson plans are subject to change due to teacher discretion, class pace and/or understanding

Monday

AP Presentation by Mrs. Davishall-Foy

 

Tuesday

  1. Reviewing Expectations for AP Language and Composition

·   No Pencil (Black or Blue Ink Only)

·   MLA Format (Heading, Title, Double Space, Citations as needed)

·   Annotation/ Questioning

·   Late Work Policy

·   AP Reading List

  1. Introduce AP Scoring Guide
  2. Begin "Thinking Rhetorically" Notes

HW:   Choose one of the following texts to read, annotate (write your annotation notes on a separate sheet of paper and turn in) by Friday.  Research the following and compile your findings in a well-organized paper:  what the historical situation was, what issues were at stake, what the purpose of the address was, and what made the particular speech memorable. YOU MUST PRINT OUT A COPY OF THE SPEECH AT HOME OR IN THE LIBRARY. CITE ANY SOURCES YOU USE IN YOUR ESSAY USING MLA FORMAT.

*YOU WILL TURN IN THE PRINTED COPY OF THE SPEECH WITH YOUR ANNOTATIONS WHEN YOU TURN IN YOUR FINAL DRAFT.

 

Wednesday

  1. Introduce Scored AP Essays
  2. Continue "Thinking Rhetorically" and begin "Composing a Rhetorical Analysis"
  3. (Use Toni Morrison's speech accepting the Nobel Prize)

HW: Continue research and write rough draft. Bring to class TOMORROW for peer evaluation.

 

Thursday

  1. Continue evaluating scored AP Essays
  2. Continue "Composing a Rhetorical Analysis" using Toni Morrison's Nobel Prize acceptance speech
  3. Peer Evaluation of Speech Analysis

HW:   Write final draft of paper.

 

Friday

Evaluating Credible Sources

AP Scored Essays Evaluations Continued

HW:   Find the following and bring to class on MONDAY:

  • a written argument on the editorial page or op-ed section in a recent newspaper, political magazines such as The Nation or The New Republic, websites of organizations (may be online newspaper) and interest groups, political blogs such as DailyKos.com or Powerline.com.  The source needs to be CREDIBLE
  • MAKE SURE IT IS AN ARTICLE THAT DOES AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
    • CHALLENGES, RANKLES, EXCITES, AMAZES OR IMPRESSES YOU
    • AN ARGUMENT RICH ENOUGH TO GIVE YOU STUFF TO ANALYZE
    • A TEXT THAT RAISES CURRENT OR ENDURING ISSUES OF SUBSTANCE
    • A TEXT THAT YOU BELIEVE SHOULD BE TAKEN MORE SERIOUSLY
  • Browse a magazine, newspaper of Website to find an example of a powerful emotional argument that's made visually, either alone or using words as well.
  • Look at the Recommended AP Reading List and choose ONE of the books to read.

 

 

S.M.E.L.L. - Evaluating argumentation and persuasion (with rhetorical appeals)  

S ender/receiver relationship: Who is the speaker? Who is the audience? What is the tone directed  
from one to the other?
 

M essage: What is the content and/or claim?  

E vidence: What kind of evidence is given and to what extent?  

L ogic: What is the quality of the reasoning? What types of appeals are being used?  

L anguage: What stylistic and rhetorical devices are being employed?  

 

 

 


Week of November 2

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace, and/or understanding

Monday

  1. Quick Write:
    Introduce forms of Compare/Contrast Writing (Block v. Point-by-Point Form)
  2. Notes:  Understanding Persona/Rhetorical Situation (Key Words:  persona, inferences, voice, rhetorical situation, tone)
  3. Practice:  Passage from Tom Sawyer
    Identify Persona and Rhetorical Situation in your editorial

HW:  Read and annotate Clinton speeches noting the differences in each area of DIDLS.  Re-write the first three paragraphs of your editorial from a different persona (professor, teenager, teacher, sports commentator,etc.) Complete activites in SAT UNIT IV. First Precis/Response due Friday

Tuesday

  1. Quick Write:
  2. Discuss Clinton speeches; Continue introduction of Compare/Contrast forms  (Neat vs. Sloppy People)
  3. Notes:  Understanding Appeals to the Audience, Understanding Subject Matter and Its Treatment (Key Words: Claim plus Support)
  4. Read article by Anderson and Cohn and answer questions
  5. Identify the appeals in your editorials.

HW:  Re-read your editorial and identify examples of the three appeals. Highlight each appeal in a different color (ethos--blue, pathos--yellow, logos--pink). Begin to organize your outline comparing/contrasting the two Clinton speeches (you will be comparing the use of appeals, diction, details, imagery, syntax, figurative language, etc. to show how Clinton creates a different persona based on the audience). Bring article and outline to class tomorrow. Complete activites in SAT UNIT IV. First Precis/Response due Friday

Wednesday

  1. Quick Write: 
  2. Discuss appeals from the editorials and Clinton speeches.
  3. Notes:  Modified Rhetorical Triangle--Understanding Context and Intention (Key words--context, intention)
  4. Identify context of your editorial.
  5. Continue Compare/Contrast Forms

HW:  Read, annotate, "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" using questions. Continue working on compare/contrast outline over Clinton speeches.  Finish SAT IV activities. First Precis/Response due Friday

Thursday

  1. Check answers to SAT Vocabulary Unit IV on projector. 
  2. Notes:  Understanding Genre
  3. Compare and Contrast Two Ads
  4. Evaluate your visual rhetoric (OPTIC)--finish for homework if needed.

HW:  Using the OPTIC Acronym, write one-two sentences for each letter using your visual.  Finish " On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" (if needed). Write TWO questions for inner/outer circle. Be prepared for a quiz, grade over annotation and questions, and class discussion. Turn in analysis of your visual.   Study for quiz over "Civil Disobedience", Class Notes, and SAT Unit IV. First Precis/Response due TOMORROW.

Friday (FIRST PRECIS/RESPONSE DUE)

  1. Quiz:  "Civil Disobedience", Class Notes, and SAT Unit IV
  2. Class Discussion over "Civil Disobedience"

HW:  Read and annotate the Declaration of Indepedence in 50 Essays using guiding questions.  In addition to the questions, identify examples of the three basic appeals of the document (color-coding as you did for your editorial).  Be prepared for a quiz on Monday.   Write rough draft for Clinton speech.  Bring on Monday for Peer Evaluation. ALSO, bring your copy of "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience."

 


Week of November 9

Lesson plans and assignments are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace and/or understanding.

Monday

  1. Check Declaration of Independence Questions/ SOAPSTONE/ Subject/Predicate
  2. Good Writing:  Thesis Statements
  3. Citing in your Clinton essay:  (Prayer Breakfast) (Address to Nation)
  4. Compare/Contrast Peer Evaluation and Teacher Writing Conferences
  5. Background over Thoreau
  6. Continue Inner/Outer Discussion

 

HW:   Write final draft of analysis paper over Clinton Speeches (use MLA format).  Tomorrow at the beginning of class, you need to turn in the following:

Ÿ Final Copy on TOP

Ÿ Rough Draft

Ÿ Outline

 

Begin SAT V activities. 

 

Make sure you have your visual and editorials in class this week.  We will discuss your visual and your application of OPTIC from last week.

 

Columnist Project:  SECOND PRECIS/RESPONSE DUE ON FRIDAY FROM COLUMNIST PROJECT.  Remember to type the ONE page précis/response and use MLA format (consult your AP "Bible" for an example, if needed)

 

Tuesday

  1. Turn in Clinton paper.
  2. Quick Write:  Visual Analysis--OPTIC
  3. Writing:  Pronoun Agreement
  4. Inner/Outer Circle Wrap-Up of Thoreau (if needed)
  5. Discuss assigned questions over Thoreau.
  6. OPTIC-Share your visual analysis from last in groups; turn in for a grade.

 

HW:   Read "Including Women in the Draft" then do two things:  1) Annotate this editorial and note how the anonymous author of this editorial creates a persona, appeals to the audience, and addresses the subject matter.  Be prepared to discuss annotations in class.

Continue SAT V Activities.

Complete Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement Handout

Columnist Project:   SECOND PRECIS/RESPONSE DUE ON FRIDAY

 

Wednesday

  1.  Check annotations and Pronoun-Antecedent Handout
  2. Quick Write: Compare and Contrast Two Ads
  3. Writing:  Staying in the Present Tense (Handout and Examples)
  4. Notes: Rhetoric at Work:  Context and the Three Appeals/Systematic Invention IIII:  The Enthymeme
  5. In groups, rewrite an ad using the same central argument but another appeal.

HW:   Finish SAT V activities.  Bring to class tomorrow so you can check before quiz on Friday.

 

Finish Precis/Response from Columnist Project to turn in on Friday.

 

Thursday

  1. Check SAT V Activities
  2. Good Writing:  AP Prompt and Essays Analysis
  3. Notes:  Rhetoric at Work:  Systematic Strategy III-The Enthymeme
  4. Identify enthymeme in "The Declaration of Independence"
  5. Group Activity:  Sports Utility Vehicle Article Analysis

 

HW:   Using your editorial, describe an enthymeme from the argument it makes. (If you are having difficulty OR if you have a lengthy editorial, you may find another one to use).  Write down the enthymeme and bring it to class tomorrow.

 

Ÿ Read and annotate handouts over "Systematic Invention IV:  The Topics" and "Intuitive Invention Strategies"

Ÿ Quiz SAT V TOMORROW

 

Columnist Project:   Finish Precis/Response to turn in TOMORROW.

 

Friday

  1. Turn in SECOND Precis/Response
  2. SAT V Quiz
  3. AP Prompt:  Rhetorical Analysis-What to Write About/Attacking the Prompt
  4. Handout Research Packet (No questions or discussion today.  Read it over the weekend, make notes, and we will discuss on MONDAY)
  5. Share Enthymemes from your article in groups.
  6. Activity: "The ABC's of Homeschooling" Analysis
  7. Background:  "A Letter from a Birmingham Jail"

 

HW:  

Ÿ Read Research Packet over the weekend.  Take notes and write down any questions you may have (I will NOT take questions until I have explained the packet.  Listen carefully as I discuss so that you will not ask questions that have already been answered).

 

Ÿ Choose THREE possible topics you would like to write on for your research paper in order of priority.

 

Ÿ Read and annotate "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr. in 50 Essays.  Once you have annotated the speech for rhetorical strategies (appeals, DIDLS, enthymemes, arrangement, etc) then answer the questions over the speech on a separate sheet of paper OR in your annotations). QUESTIONS LISTED BELOW (DO NOT DO THE COUNTER ARGUMENT PAGE).   COMPLETE annotations and questions and bring to class on Monday.

 

Ÿ Write 2 questions over "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" for inner/outer circle discussion on TUESDAY

 

Reminders:

Ÿ Bring all of the essays we have read to class each day (both printed versions and 50 Essays) because we will be identifying strategies in each of them in the upcoming weeks and using them as we prepare for the AP Exam

Ÿ Make sure you are completing your OUTSIDE reading from the non-fiction reading list.

 

 


Week of November 16

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace and/or understanding

 

AP Language and Composition

Week of November 16

 

NO SAT VOCABULARY UNTIL AFTER THANKSGIVING.

Monday

  1. Poll Everywhere
  2. Discuss Research Project
  3. Speech Analysis Re-write
  4. Begin Notes: Context and the Three Appeals/Systematic Invention III:  The Enthymeme

HW:

Ÿ Read and annotate "On Keeping a Notebook" by Joan Didion in 50 Essays.  Answer the questions posted on the class website ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER.

 

Ÿ Begin Speech Analysis Re-write.  DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24.

 

Research Paper:   Begin researching topic for paper. Include counterarguments in your research Research Proposal due November 23.

 

Columnist Project:   Prepare THIRD Précis/Response for FRIDAY (Typed in MLA Format).


Tuesday

  1. Quick Write:  Consider the diaries, journals, or notebooks you might have kept from time to time.  Discuss their importance in your life in relation to what Didion says about keeping a notebook.
  2. Group Discussion:  Didion Questions
  3. Check answers to AP Multiple Choice Questions over "Letter from a Birmingham Jail"
  4. Continue notes: Systematic Invention III:  The Enthymeme
  5. Identify enthymemes in "The Declaration of Independence" and "Civil Disobedience"
  6. Group Activity:  Sports Utility Vehicle Article Analysis

 

HW:   Using your editorial, describe an enthymeme from the argument it makes.  Write down the enthymeme and bring to class tomorrow.  REVIEW "The Topics" and "Intuitive Invention Strategies" in the packet from last week. BRING PACKET TO CLASS TOMORROW.

 

Research Paper:   Begin researching topic for paper. Include counterarguments in your research Research Proposal due November 23.

 

Continue Speech Analysis Re-write.  DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24.

 

Columnist Project:   Prepare THIRD Précis/Response for FRIDAY (Typed in MLA Format).


 Wednesday

  1. Mini-Lesson:  Finding Credible Sources (Including Counterarguments)
  2. Discuss enthymemes from editorials
  3. Finish notes, discussions, activities from yesterday (if needed)
  4. Group Activity:  "The ABC's of Homeschooling" Analysis
  5. Discuss Arrangement in "The Declaration of Independence" and "Civil Disobedience"

HW:  Continue Speech Analysis Re-write.  DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24.

 

Research Paper :  Continue to gather information for research paper using Credible Sources Guidelines. Include counterarguments in your research.

 

Columnist Project :  Prepare THIRD Précis/Response for FRIDAY (Typed in MLA Format).

 

 

 


Thursday

  1. Quick Write:  Visual Analysis-OPTIC
  2. Mini-Lesson:  MLA Format
  3. Notes:  Style & Situation, Jargon, Contractions, Passive/Active Voice, Sentences, Words, and Fragments
  4. Activity:  Booker T. Washington

 

HW: Continue Speech Analysis Re-write.  DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24

 

Research Paper :  Continue to gather information for research paper using Credible Sources Guidelines. Include counterarguments in your research.

 

Columnist Project: Finish THIRD Précis/Response for TOMORROW (Typed in MLA Format).


Friday

  1. Turn in THIRD Précis/Response
  2. Research Project:  Writing an Argument (if needed)
  3. Review Types of Sentences and identify in King's Letter
  4. Notes:  Words-General vs. Specific, Formal vs. Informal, Common vs. Slang or Jargon

HW:  

To help you remember and have a handy reference for the stylistic devices, you are to make a chart with definitions and examples of schemes and tropes (we will do tropes on Monday).  You can make the chart on a computer, hand write/draw it, or whatever you want to do to organize the information into a handy reference.  I suggest possibly color-coding the different schemes to help you remember. You might want to do the schemes on one side and the tropes on the other. YOU WILL USE THIS CHART AS A REFERENCE REPEATEDLY, SO MAKE IT NEAT, COLORFUL AND READABLE. DO NOT PUT IT ON NOTEBOOK PAPER

 

Make a chart of with definitions and examples of the following:

Passive vs. Active Voice

Types of Sentences,

Schemes

  Schemes Involving Balance

  Parallelism of words, phrases, clauses

  Antithesis of words, phrases, clauses

  Schemes Involving Interruption

  Parenthesis

  Appositive

  Schemes Involving Omission

  Ellipsis

  Asyndeton

  Schemes Involving Repetition

  Alliteration, Assonance, Anaphora, Epistrophe, Anadiplosis, Climax

 

THE FINAL CHART IS DUE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2.

 

Research Paper :  Continue to gather information for research paper using Credible Sources Guidelines. Include counterarguments in your research. Complete Research Proposal-DUE MONDAY

 

Continue Speech Analysis Re-write.  DUE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24

 

YOU GUYS ARE THE BEST!  ALL OF YOUR HARD WORK AND DEDICATION IS GOING TO PAY OFF!  HANG IN THERE. . .THE HOLIDAYS ARE COMING (AND SO IS THE BREAK YOU DESERVE!)


Week of November 23

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace and/or understanding

Monday

1. Turn in Research Paper Formal Proposal

2. TBA

 

Tuesday

1. Turn in Speech Re-Write Assignment

2. TBA

Holiday Homework:

  • Continue research for your paper. Decide what sources you will use and begin to print. All sources must be in class with you on along with a folder with brads and different colored highlighters on December 1 .
  • Work on Schemes and Tropes chart-- Due December 2nd
  • Continue outside non-fiction reading.

 

Have a delightful Thanksgiving Holiday!  Count your blessings--you have much for which to be thankful!  I am thankful for each of you!

Love, Mrs. Ray


Week of November 30

L esson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace, and/or understanding.

  Monday

  1. Quick Write: Article by Maureen Dowd
  2. Notes:   Toulmin Argument
  3. Group Activity:   Discuss Pre-writing Questions:   Steps 5 & 6


HW:   SEE BELOW  

Research Project :   Print out the sources you have collected thus far and bring to class on THURSDAY along with highlighters and folder.

Columnist Project :   Begin writing Precis/Response #4. (Typed and in MLA Format)


Tuesday

  1. Quick Write: TBA
  2. Mini-Lesson:   Plaigerism
  3. Notes:   Structuring Arguments-Writing the Argument Essay

HW:     Finish Schemes and Tropes Chart, if needed.

Research Project :    Continue researching for paper.

Columnist Project :   Continue writing Precis/Response #4.


Wednesday

  1. Quick Write:   Visual Analysis
  2. Turn in Schemes and Tropes Chart
  3. Mini-Lesson:   The Sentence Outline
  4.   Notes:   Structuring Arguments-Offering Evidence and Good Reasons

Research Project:  Continue any research if needed. Bring articles, highlighters, and folder to class tomorrow.

Columnist Project :   Continue writing Precis/Response #4.


Thursday

  1. Grammar Lesson:   Appositives
  2. Notes:   Structuring Arguments:   Toulmin Model
  3. Mini-Lesson:  In-Text Citation and Embedded Quotes

HW: Complete the handout over Types of Sentences.   DUE ON  TUESDAY.

Research Project: Write Preliminary Outline and b ring to class TOMORROW.

Columnist Project :   Finish writing Precis/Response #4.

  Friday

  1. Turn in Precis/Response #4.
  2. Notes:   Determining Warrants (iCite)-Part I
  3. Turn in Preliminary Outline for a grade. Begin writing Point I Introduction and Background finish at home.  Due MONDAY.

HW:   Complete Types of Sentences Handout-Due TUESDAY

Research Project:   Write Point II  Introduction and Background over the weekend and bring on MONDAY.   Bring Point III and ALL printed sources for Point III to class on Monday.  

REMINDERS:  I am taking PROCESS GRADES .   You will receive daily grades for the following items, which will eventually be averaged into ONE MAJOR GRADE.  

Ÿ   Point I

Ÿ   Point II

Ÿ   Point III

Ÿ   Point IV

Ÿ   Point V (Subject to Change)

Ÿ   Introduction/Background

  • Conclusion

Ÿ   Thesis

 



 


Week of December 7

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace and/or understanding.

Monday

  1. Quick Write:  TBA
  2. Turn in Introduction and Background
  3. Mini-Lesson:  MLA Format
  4. The Toulmin Model:  Definitions and Model for Writing (Part I)

Research Paper:  Type Formal Outline; Write your rough draft and bring COMPLETED ROUGH DRAFT to class on THURSDAY for Peer Evaluation

Columnist Project:  Begin writing Precis/Response #5

Tuesday

  1. Quick Write:  TBA
  2. Turn in Formal Outline
  3. The Toulmin Model:  Definitions and Model for Writing (Part II)
  4. Read:  "Against School:  How Public Education Cripples Our Kids and Why"
  5. Write a thesis for this article using the Toulmin Model

HW:  Write your rough draft and bring COMPLETED ROUGH DRAFT to class on THURSDAY for Peer Evaluation

Columnist Project:  Write Precis/Response #5

Wednesday

  1. Quick Write:  TBA

 

HW:  Write your rough draft and bring COMPLETED ROUGH DRAFT to class TOMORROW for Peer Evaluation

Columnist Project:  Write Precis/Response #5

Thursday

  1. Peer Evaluation of Rough Draft

Columnist Project:  Finish writing Precis/Response #5

Friday

  1. Turn in Precis/Response #5
  2. Finish Peer Evaluation of Rough Draft

 

Week of December 14

Lesson plans are subject to change based on teacher discretion, class pace and/or understanding

Monday

  1. Second Rough Draft Due
  2. Final Peer Review
  3. Works Cited Reminders

Tuesday

  1. Final questions over research paper
  2. Organizing Research Folder
  3. Non-Fiction Outside Reading Project

Wednesday

  1. Early Turn in for Research Paper (+10 Points)

Thursday

  1. Research Paper Due TODAY

Friday

  1. TBA

REMINDERS :

  • Make sure you finish your non-fiction outside reading over the holidays if you have not already done so
  • Begin preparing for your outside reading project--DUE January 19
  • Buy 5 Steps to a 5 on AP Language and Composition as well as Huckleberry Finn by January 5 if you have not already done so.

 

Happy Holidays, my wonderful AP students!  

You have worked hard this semester and this break is well-deserved! I continue to be amazed by all of you, and I am so grateful that we are making this journey together.

Enjoy your time off!  See you in the New Year!

Week of January 4

 

BRING 50 ESSAYS TO CLASS EVERYDAY THIS WEEK. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE THIS BOOK YOU WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR FINDING THIS ESSAY ON YOUR OWN.   I WILL NOT BE POSTING IT ON THE WEBSITE ANY LONGER.

Huckleberry Finn books must be in class by Monday, January 11

Monday

  1. Warm-Up: 
  2. Review Syllogism, Enthymeme, and Toulmin Model
  3. Introduce Model for Writing the Toulmin Argument
  4. Read articles in groups and practice using method for writing Toulmin Model 

HW:

Ÿ Read and annotate "Why Don't We Complain" by William Buckley, Jr. in 50 Essays .

REMINDER :   Annotation requires interaction with the text-merely highlighting is NOT enough nor is one word in the margin.   Identify rhetorical devices, appeals, claims, etc.  

Ÿ Work on Non-fiction Reading Project due January 19

Ÿ Begin SAT Vocabulary Unit VI

 Tuesday

  1. Quick Write:
  2. Discuss "Why Don't We Complain"
  3. In groups, answer questions on Rhetoric and Style from "Why Don't We Complain."   DUE AT THE END OF CLASS .

TOMORROW --AP MULTIPLE CHOICE QUIZ OVER "WHY DON'T WE COMPLAIN".   QUIZ WILL COUNT AS ONE QUIZ GRADE.

 

HW: Read and annotate "Television:   The Plug-In Drug" by Marie Winn. Complete SOAPSTone analysis (Subject, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Speaker, Tone).   You may write this information on the first page or the last page of the essay in your book. What inferences can you make about the writer, Marie Winn from this information?

 

Ÿ Work on Non-fiction Reading Project due January 19

Ÿ Continue SAT Vocabulary Unit VI

 

Wednesday

  1. AP Multiple Choice Quiz over "Why Don't We Complain."
  2. Discuss Toulmin Model (Qualifications)
  3. Example of an Argument Prompt (Supports, Challenges, Qualifies)
  4. Discuss   "Television:   The Plug-In Drug".   Apply the Toulmin model to Winn's argument in paragraph 35.  

 

HW: Answer the following questions over "Television:   The Plug-In Drug."

  1. Winn begins her piece with a reminder that television has been with us for just over fifty years, and supplies three observations from critics in 1949.   What is the effect of the temporal context she provides?
  2. Explain the rhetorical effect of the three statements she quotes on the first page.
  3. Winn uses her introduction to prepare readers for the thesis she delivers at the end of paragraph 8.   Does that preparation appeal more to ethos, pathos, or logos?
  4. Winn includes many quotations as support.   What is the effect of these statements?
  5. Read paragraph 21 carefully.   Could not the same argument be made about reading?   If so, might the paragraph have a dissuasive effect?   Explain.
  6. Explain the effect of the rhetorical questions in paragraph 29.
  7. Read carefully paragraphs 14, 32, and 35.   Explain the effect of the rhetorical strategy Winn uses in the first two sentences of each paragraph.   Comment on the effectiveness of using a similar strategy three times.
  8. Explain the association Winn develops among qualities discussed in paragraphs 33-35.

Ÿ Work on Non-fiction Reading Project due January 19  

Ÿ Continue SAT Vocabulary Unit VI

Thursday

  1. AP Multiple Choice Quiz over "Television:   The Plug-In Drug."
  2. Notes:   Introduction to Mark Twain

HW:   Read and annotate "A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift.   Identify the three appeals and look for elements of the Toulmin Model of Argument (Warrant and Data).   Be prepared to discuss in class tomorrow.

Ÿ Study for SAT Quiz VI TOMORROW!

Ÿ Work on Non-fiction Reading Project due January 19

Friday

  1. SAT Quiz VI
  2. Discuss "A Modest Proposal"
  3. Discuss satire and irony
  4. Discuss academic voice and directions for weekend essay and reading.

 

HW:   Read the excerpt from "The Damned Human Race" by Mark Twain. Then complete the following assignment:

 

You are to write a summary/response paper on Twain's essay, "The Damned Human Race."

Ÿ In the first part of your paper, the summary , you should summarize the essay by discerning the most significant points Twain makes.   Summarize his assertions objectively.   Do not attempt to analyze, interpret, evaluate or inject your opinion.   In other words, report on his essay.   Use academic voice in this section of your paper.

Ÿ In the second section, the response , comment on Twain's essay. How do you interpret it?   What do you think about it?   With which points do you agree?   Disagree?   Why?   Evaluate it.   Is this an effective essay?   Why?   You should use first person ("I") in this section of the paper because I am specifically asking for you opinion.

 

The paper should be a minimum of one page typed in MLA format (no need to use in-text citations since you are only using one source).

 *This assignment is compliments of Mr. Gunnar (www.mrgunnar.net)

 

 

 

Week of January 11

MUST HAVE 5 STEPS TO A 5 ON THE THE AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION IN CLASS ON FRIDAY.

Monday
1. Turn in essay over "The Damned Human Race"
2. Reading Schedule for Huck Finn
3. Finish Satire Notes
4. Discuss "A Modest Proposal"


HW:  Begin Reading Huck Finn  Notice-Ch. 4;  Study for Nine Week's Test (Re-read "A Letter from a Birmingham Jail" and review rhetorical devices used by King in the letter.

Tuesday
1. Review Building an AP Essay
2. Huck Finn:  The Controversy
3. Themes in Huck Finn
4. Socratic Discussion Huck Finn Notice-Ch. 4

HW:  Read and annotate Huck Finn Ch.  5-11; study for Nine Week's Test (Re-read "A Letter from a Birmingham Jail" and review rhetorical devices used by King in the letter.)


Wednesday
1. AP Language and Composition Nine Weeks Assessment (Writing)

HW: Read and annotate Huck Finn Ch. 5-11; study for Nine Week's Test Multiple Choice using Review Sheet


Thursday
1.  AP Language and Composition Nine Weeks Assessment (Multiple Choice)

HW: Read and annotate Huck Finn Ch. 5-11

Friday
1. Building an AP Essay (Part II)
2. Reviewing AP Prompts and Sample Essays
3. Timed Writing Schedule
4. Socratic Seminar:  Huck Finn Ch. 5-11 (Continued on Monday, if needed)

HW:  Read and annotate Huck Finn Ch. 12-14; REVIEW ALL STUDY QUESTIONS FOR A SOCRATIC SEMINAR ON MONDAY (and possibly a QUIZ).


Nine Weeks Test Review:

Rhetorical Devices
Loose v. Periodic Sentences
Metaphors
Simile
Anthesis
Antimetabole
Parallelism
Allusions
Anaphora
Oxymoron
Rhetorical Question
Irony
Juxtaposition
Pun
Hyperbole
Litotes (Understatement)
Satire
Paradox

Argumentation
Enthymeme
Claim
Warrant
Data
Backing
Qualifier
Syllogism
Because_______Therefore________Since (Model for Writing a Toulmin Argument)

Readings
Declaration of Independence
Civil Disobedience
Letter from a Birmingham Jail
Modest Proposal
Why Don't We Complain

Week of January 19

DUE DATES:

TWO Reaction Papers January 21, 25, 27

Study Guide Questions (Group Project)   February 1

Quick 8 Writing Assignments   January 29

Final Argumentative Writing Assignment   February 3

Study guide questions need to be typed or handwritten NEATLY in complete sentences ON THE FRONT SIDE OF THE PAPER ONLY.  YOU DO NOT NEED TO WRITE THE QUESTION-JUST ANSWER IT FULLY INCORPORATING THE QUESTION INTO THE ANSWER.

The two Reaction Writing Assignments and Final Argumentative Writing Assignment must be typed in MLA Format with in-text citations (a Works Cited page is not required since I am providing the essays)

Quick 8 Writing Assignments will be 8 daily grades averaged together for a MAJOR GRADE

The Reaction Papers will be counted as TWO individual quiz grades and then averaged together for a MAJOR GRADE.

The Study Guide questions will be TWO quiz grades.

The Final Argumentative Writing Assignment is a MAJOR Grade.

  Monday

SCHOOL HOLIDAY

 

Tuesday

  1. Quick 8 Writing Assignment
  2. Go over Nine Weeks Test
  3. Schedule appointments to discuss rhetorical analysis
  4. Discuss Reaction Papers
  5. Group Projects:  Study Guide Discussion Questions
  6. Begin Non-Fiction Reading Presentations

  HW:   Read and annotate Huck Finn   Ch. 15-17;  answer study guide questions for Notice-Ch. 17.  Begin SAT VII.  Write Reaction Paper #1-DUE THURSDAY.

  Wednesday

  1. Quick 8 Writing Assignment
  2. Non-Fiction Presentations

 HW: Read and annotate Huck Finn Ch. 18-20; answer study guide questions.  Continue SAT VII. Finish Reaction Paper #1-DUE THURSDAY.

  Thursday

  1. Quick 8 Writing Assignment
  2. Finish Non-Fiction Reading Presentations
  3. Group Projects:  Study Guide Discussion Questions

 HW: Read and annotate Huck Finn Ch. 21-24; answer study guide questions; finish SAT VII.

  Friday

1.  AP Timed Writing

  HW:  Read and annotate Ch. 25-30; catch up on any reading or study guide questions you need to complete; Write Reaction Paper #2-DUE MONDAY.

Reaction Papers

To achieve success in academia, you must be able to read, understand, and critique articles from the primary scientific literature. Very little scientific progress is made without considering what others have done before. Only by reviewing the literature critically can a student begin to find areas in the field that are ripe for additional research. Thus, to demonstrate your understanding, and to practice your technical writing ability, you must turn in a reaction paper for selected readings. (I will try to select readings that are provocative!) These papers may be informal, and they should be about two pages long.

A reaction paper should be more than a simple summary of the material; it should contain your opinion or reaction to reading the material. This may take on a variety of forms: you may compare the work to other related material (including but not limited to other readings from the class); you may hypothesize about ways in which the work could have been improved; you may think about ways to expand on the work, or extend it to cover new domains; or you may argue against the work, questioning its assumptions, or value.

Reaction papers will be graded primarily on your communication skills, and only secondarily on the content and originality of your ideas. The ability to express oneself clearly is an important skill.  Therefore, your paper, like all good essays, should include an introductory paragraph stating your main premise, a body where your detail your ideas, and a brief concluding paragraph. Although the reaction paper should not summarize the entire text, it should include enough information about the text to make your ideas or criticisms well-grounded. Assume your readers have also read the text, but that they need reminders about any details you wish to discuss. Try to avoid the temptation of having two sections: (1) summary, and (2) reaction. Instead, it is best if you can interweave these two components (while being clear about which is which, of course).

 

You have three opportunities to write a 500-word response to any section of the novel. You can pick any aspect that shows your thoughts on the assigned reading outside of summaries. The topic can range from race issues, comparisons or contrasts, cause and effect, rhetorical devices, symbols, satire, arguments, etc. Part of the assignment is creating an interesting and original topic about which to write.

 

You need only write TWO of the reaction papers.  You choose which one you will skip.

 

Remember, while Huck Finn is the focus, you can go beyond by connecting it to current events, etc.

 

Keep in mind:

• Follow the format for writing an AP Essay (thesis, textual support, commentary, intro/body/conclusion)

• 500 words

• Creative title

• Vary sentences and sentence openers (simple, compound, complex, compound-complex)

 

Quick 8 Topics

 

You'll work on a Quick 8 for each day for the first eight class periods. (Remember: you'll write for eight minutes at the start of each class). Below are the topics that you will write on. While all of these are due on Friday, January 28, you may choose the order in which you complete them, as well as choosing which two to skip. Be sure that the Quick 8 number, topic, and date are on each entry. Please use a new piece of paper for each entry and write only on the front of the page.  This will ensure that the entries are in numerical order.

 

• #1: Define your understanding of race issues in America.

• #2: How is race portrayed in television, movies, and music today?

• #3: In your opinion, what types of books should be banned in schools? Have you read a book that you though wasn't appropriate for school reading? (Please focus on offensive or disturbing, rather than "boring")

• #4: How is Jim stereotyped in the novel?

 

Topics 5-8 are quotations from Mark Twain. Write about the meaning of them and the connections you see to our world.

 

• #5: "Always do right. This will gratify some people, and astonish the rest."

• #6: "A classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read."

• #7: "It's impossible to maintain one's innocence in a corrupt world."

• #8: "Man is the only animal that blushes. Or needs to."

• #9 & #10: Free write. Use this entry to write on any subject that you like.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment:
 Reaction Paper Example
 
Week of January 25

TWO Reaction Papers January 25 and 27

Quick 8 Writing Assignments  January 29

Study Guide Questions (Group Project)  February 1

Final Argumentative Writing Assignment  February 3

Study guide questions need to be typed or handwritten NEATLY in complete sentences ON THE FRONT SIDE OF THE PAPER ONLY. YOU DO NOT NEED TO WRITE THE QUESTION-JUST ANSWER IT FULLY INCORPORATING THE QUESTION INTO THE ANSWER.

The two Reaction Writing Assignments and Final Argumentative Writing Assignment must be typed in MLA Format with in-text citations (a Works Cited page is not required since I am providing the essays)

Quick 8 Writing Assignments will be 8 daily grades averaged together for a MAJOR GRADE

The Reaction Papers will be counted as TWO individual quiz grades and then averaged together for a MAJOR GRADE.

The Study Guide questions will be TWO quiz grades.

The Final Argumentative Writing Assignment is a MAJOR Grade.

 

Monday (1/25)

  1. Quick 8 Writing 
  2. Turn in Reaction Paper.
  3. Finish Non-Fiction Presentations (if needed)
  4. Group Projects:  Study Guide Discussion Questions
  5. Begin individual appointments to discuss rhetorical analysis

HW:  Read and annotate HF Ch. 31-33; answer study guide questions; Begin SAT VIII.

Tuesday (1/26)  

  1. Quick 8 Writing Assignment
  2. Finish Non-Fiction Reading Presentations (if needed)
  3. Analyze AP Sample Essay Responses to 2005 Free Response Question
  4. Group Projects: Study Guide Discussion Questions
  5. Continue individual appointments to discuss rhetorical analysis

HW:   Read and annotate  Huck Finn Ch. 34-35; answer study guide questions. Continue SAT VIII. 

 

Wednesday (1/27)      

  1. Quick 8 Writing Assignment
  2. Turn in Reaction Paper.
  3. Discussion:  Elements of Satire in Huck Finn
  4. Rhetorical Device:  Analogy
  5. Group Projects:   Study Guide Discussion Questions  

HW:  Read and annotate  Huck Finn  Ch. 36-39;   YOU DO NOT NEED TO WRITE THE ESSAY OVER THESE CHAPTERS. Continue SAT VIII. 

Thursday (1/28)      

  1. Quick 8 Writing Assignment
  2. Continue Discussion: Elements of Satire in Huck Finn
  3. Discuss Final Argumentative Essay over Huck Finn
  4. Group Projects: Study Guide Discussion Questions

HW:  Read and annotate  Huck Finn  Ch. 40-End; answer study guide questions; finish SAT VIII; quick 8 Writing Assignments--DUE TOMORROW. Finish SAT VIII. 

Friday (1/29)

  1. Turn in Quick 8 Writing Assignments
  2. AP Timed Writing

   

HW : Read and annotate essays by Smiley and Morrison; write rough draft for argumentative essay; bring to class for peer editing on TUESDAY; complete study guide questions--DUE MONDAY

 

Coming Up. . .

Memoir Reading List (Project TBA--DUE March 1)

 


Week of February 1

 

Memoir Project-Due February 25  

Read and/or listen to the news EVERY DAY .   We will have a current event quiz next WEDNESDAY.

 

Monday

  1. Quick Write: Rhetorical Strategies:  Example
  2. Finish Non-Fiction Projects (if needed)
  3. Begin "I Say/They Say" Introduction to Argumentative Writing
  4. Continue AP Essay Analysis

 

HW:  SAT IX.  Read, annotate, and complete activities in "Introduction to the Analysis Essay" in 5 Steps to a 5 for the following sections:

Ÿ "Reading and Notating the Passage" (Read and notate as instructed)

Ÿ "Developing the Opening Paragraph" (Write an opening paragraph as instructed)

Ÿ Using one of your Timed Writings, complete the Sentence Opening Sheet. 

 

Tuesday

  1. Quick Write:  Rhetorical Strategies:  Contrast/Comparison
  2. Finish Non-Fiction Projects (if needed)
  3. Continue "I Say/They Say" to Argumentative Writing
  4. Continue AP Essay Analysis

 

HW: SAT IX.  Read, annotate, and complete activities in "Introduction to the Analysis Essay" in 5 Steps to a 5 for the following sections:

Ÿ "Writing the Body of the Essay"-you do NOT need to write the body of the essay

Ÿ "Sample Student Essays"-Read and Rate on your own, the READ

Ÿ "Rating the Essays" and compare your scores with theirs

Using one of your Timed Essays, complete the Sentence Opening Sheet

 

Wednesday

  1. Quick Write: Rhetorical Strategies:  Cause/Effect
  2. Continue "I Say/They Say" to Argumentative Writing
  3. Discuss Elements of Satire in Huck Finn

 

HW: SAT IX.  Write rough draft for argumentative paper. Read "Other Types of Analysis Essays" in 5 Steps to a 5.

 

Thursday

  1. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Multiple Choice Test 
  2. Peer Editing:  Argumentative Paper

 

HW:   Write final draft of argumentative paper. 

 

Friday

  1. Turn in Argumentative Essay
  2. Rhetorical Analysis Timed Writing

 

HW:   Complete activities in "Comprehensive Review-Analysis" for the following sections:

Ÿ Classification

Ÿ Process

Ÿ Definition

Ÿ Narration

Ÿ Description

 

Read  "Introduction to the Argumentative Essay" in 5 Steps to a 5 and complete the activities in the following sections:

Ÿ Some Basics

Ÿ Timing and planning the Essay

Ÿ Working the Prompt

Ÿ Developing the Opening Paragraph

Ÿ Developing the Body of the Essay

Ÿ Sample Student Essays (Read and Rate then compare your scores to the book's scores)

Ÿ Rating the Essay

 

  WRITE THE FINAL DRAFT OF YOUR ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY.  DUE MONDAY.

Choosing one of your AP Timed Writings, rewrite (in your NEATEST handwriting) the essay varying your sentence openers, verbs, and the length of the sentences.

 

Also, make any other corrections necessary to improve your score (punctuation, grammar, capitalization, more mature vocabulary, etc.)

 

Rewrite  is due MONDAY at the beginning of class.

 

 

 

Templates for Introducing Quotes

 

Week of February 8

Memoir Project Due February 25

Current Event Quiz Wednesday

BRING 50 ESSAYS BOOK TO CLASS FOR THE REST OF THE WEEK.

Monday

  1. Rhetorical Devices:  Analogy
  2. Introduction to Fallacies:  Red Herring

HW:  Write final draft of argumentative essays

Tuesday

  1. Turn in Argumentative Essays
  2. Continue Introduction to Fallacies
  3. Analysis of Timed Writings

HW:  Rewrite introduction of timed writing.  

Read and complete activities "Comprehensive Review-Argument" in 5 Steps to a 5 in the following sections:

Ÿ "Some Basics"

Ÿ "The Argument

BRING 50 ESSAYS BOOK TO CLASS FOR THE REST OF THE WEEK.

Wednesday

  1. Current Events Quiz
  2. Continue Introduction to Fallacies
  3. Continue Analysis of Timed Writings

HW:  Rewrite body and conclusion of timed writing.  Read and complete activities "Comprehensive Review-Argument" in 5 Steps to a 5 in the following sections:

Ÿ "Writing the Argument"

Read "Me Talk Pretty One Day" or "Lost in the Kitchen" (based on assignment from class). In each piece, find an example of the following and bring to class tomorrow:

hyperbole

irony

sarcasm

understatement

stereotypes

tone

Thursday

  1. Turn in Timed Writing Rewrite
  2. Continue Introduction to Fallacies
  3. Answer Questions over Rhetoric and Style as a group.

HW:  Finish rewriting body of timed writing.  Read and annotate "Comprehensive Review-Argument" in 5 Steps to a 5 in the following sections:

Ÿ "Reading the Argument"

Friday

Ms. Davishall/Foy will be here to talk about the AP exam.

HW:   Read "Section I of the Exam-The Multiple Choice Questions" in 5 Steps to a 5 .  Take the Diagnostic Multiple Choice Test-Give yourself ONE hour to complete it.  I know this is a lot of time for the weekend, but if you are HONEST with yourself and the time, you can get an accurate view of where you currently stand and how you need to improve.

 

Bring your scores on Monday.  I am NOT taking a grade on the test itself .

 

Once you finish taking and scoring your exam, write a brief essay detailing your score, your strengths, weaknesses, and strategies for improvement on future exams. I am taking this up for a quiz grade on MONDAY.

 

I am taking a grade on your analysis of your scores.

 

Ÿ Read and/or listen to the news.

 

ON MONDAY, YOU WILL TAKE AN AP MULTIPLE CHOICE QUIZ OVER THE READINGS FROM 50 ESSAYS.  MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR BOOK.

NOTE:   Test over SAT VII, VIII, and IX, Types of Fallacies, Rhetorical Terms, strategies for Rhetorical Analysis and Argumentative Essay Thursday, February 18.  

 

 

"

Week of February 15

Memoir Project Due February 25

NO MAJOR TEST THIS WEEK.  I HAVE DECIDED TO JUST INCLUDE IT IN QUIZZES AND ON THE NINE WEEK'S EXAM.

CLICK ON LINKS TO TEXT OF INAUGURAL ADDRESSES.

Monday

School Holiday

 

Tuesday

  1. Multiple Choice Quiz over last week's readings
  2. Review Rhetorical Devices in JFK Speech (Parallelism, antithesis, tricolon, anaphora, rhetorical question, metaphor, simile, or analogy, allusions)
  3. Evaluate good/poor introductions for rhetorical analysis essays
  4. Rewrite poor introductions to improve them
  5. In a group, write an introduction to the Stewart prompt

 

HW : Read and annotate Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address using the following steps:

  1. Write a one sentence summary of each paragraph.
  2. Identify examples of the following devices:   parallelism, anaphora (type of parallelism), antithesis, biblical allusion, tricolon
  3. For each device answer the question:   What does the device DO?

Biblical Allusions :   Read the following references in the Bible (or at www.biblegateway.com ) and answer the following questions:

The Love Chapter

I Corinthians Ch. 13

The Apostle Paul is speaking to the church at Corinth

List the analogies in the first three verses?    What two things are being compared?

List at least TWO rhetorical devices in verses 4-7 (uses your Schemes and Tropes Chart to help you)

Summarize verse 11.

List the rhetorical device in verse 13.    What is significant about the order?

 

Wednesday

  1. Quick Write: Challenge, defend, qualify
  2. Discuss Biblical Allusions
  3. Discuss rhetorical devices in Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address
  4. Finish writing introduction to Stewart prompt and begin first body paragraph

 

HW :   Read and annotate President Obama's Inaugural Address for the rhetorical devices and explain what they "do"; be sure to write a sentence summarizing each paragraph; note themes, references to the previous administration, etc as well as patterns used by Kennedy. Also, noting the biblical allusion to "putting away childish things" (I Corinthians 13), what is President Obama implying?

 

Biblical Allusions : Read the following references in the Bible (or at www.biblegateway.com ) and answer the following questions:

 

The Prodigal Son/ "Kill the fattened calf" (Luke 15)

Who are the characters in the story?

Describe the younger brother and the request he makes, and the actions that follow.

Describe the father and his responses to the younger brother's request and his eventual return home.

Describe the older brother, his response to his younger brother, and the father's response to him.

What do you think the expression "Kill the fattened calf" means today?

Give an example of someone from a movie, literature, etc. who might be considered a prodigal son.

 

Thursday

  1. Quick Write: Challenge, defend, qualify
  2. Discuss President Obama's Inaugural Address and analyze rhetorical devices
  3. Finish writing first body paragraph for Stewart prompt

 

HW:   Read and annotate " A New, Tougher Kind of Politics " and " We needed that speech therapy". Note any rhetorical devices AND arguments used within the editorials.   Write a brief summary of each editorial in the margins.

Go to:   Inaugural Address Word Clouds

 

These "wordclouds" take the most frequently used (repeated) words in inaugural addresses and make those used the most the largest words in the cloud.   What do you learn about each speech from these word clouds?   What do you learn about diction from these word clouds?

 

Friday

AP Timed Writing

 

HW :   Rewrite your Stewart essay and turn in on Monday.   You may handwrite your essay in PEN and LEGIBLY.  

 

Biblical Allusions : Read the following references in the Bible (or at www.biblegateway.com ) and answer the following questions:

 

Judas   (Matthew 26: 14-16; 47-50)

Who is Judas according to v. 14?

How much money did the chief priests give Judas?

What signal has Judas arranged to use?

Give an example of a literary or historical figure that might be alluded to as a "Judas"

 

CLICK ON THE ESSAY BELOW AND PRINT.

Read and annotate "Listen to Their Logic" by H.L. Mencken . ANSWER THE QUESTIONS BELOW ON YOUR OWN PAPER--NOT IN THE TEXT. BRING YOUR ANNOTATED ESSAY AND THE ANSWERED QUESTIONS TO CLASS ON MONDAY.

Analysis of Listen to Their Logic

 

What are some adjectives that characterize the tone of this essay?

 

 

Find examples of the following techniques used by Mencken to prove his theory (Cite paragraph #):

 

Anecdote:

 

 

Hyperbole

 

 

Analogy:

 

 

Definition:

 

 

List qualities which Mencken attributes to:

 

  1. school teachers:

 

 

 

  1. most high school students:

 

 

 

 

  1. most thinkers:

 

 

 

Based on your own experience as a writer, do you agree or disagree with Mencken's theory?   Explain.

 

 

  BE PREPARED TO COMPLETE ACTIVITES OVER THE ABOVE ESSAY ON MONDAY.

 

BRING THE STEWART ESSAY ON MONDAY. WE WILL BE EVALUATING IT.  

 

NO EXCUSES FOR NOT HAVING YOUR WORK COMPLETED.

 

 

Bring 50 Essays Book to class on MONDAY

 

  Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address

At this second appearing to take the oath of the presidential office, there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Then a statement, somewhat in detail, of a course to be pursued, seemed fitting and proper. Now, at the expiration of four years, during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on every point and phase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention, and engrosses the energies of the nation, little that is new could be presented. The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself; and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.

On the occasion corresponding to this four years ago, all thoughts were anxiously directed to an impending civil war. All dreaded it--all sought to avert it. While the inaugeral [sic] address was being delivered from this place, devoted altogether to saving the Union without war, insurgent agents were in the city seeking to destroy it without war--seeking to dissole [sic] the Union, and divide effects, by negotiation. Both parties deprecated war; but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive; and the other would accept war rather than let it perish. And the war came.

One eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the Southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was, somehow, the cause of the war. To strengthen, perpetuate, and extend this interest was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union, even by war; while the government claimed no right to do more than to restrict the territorial enlargement of it. Neither party expected for the war, the magnitude, or the duration, which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with, or even before, the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God; and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces; but let us judge not that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered; that of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has his own purposes. "Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh!" If we shall suppose that American Slavery is one of those offences which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South, this terrible war, as the woe due to those by whom the offence came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a Living God always ascribe to Him? Fondly do we hope--fervently do we pray--that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue, until all the wealth piled by the bond-man's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash, shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said "the judgments of the Lord, are true and righteous altogether"

With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan--to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations.


Week of February 22

Monday

  1. Introduce Argument Essay Format
  2. Challenge or Defend:  "Fear always springs from ignorance."
  3. Score Rhetorical Analysis

HW:  Memoir Project

Tuesday

  1. AP Multiple Choice Quiz
  2. Continue writing argument essay
  3. Continue scoring rhetorical analysis

HW:  Memoir Project

Wednesday

  1. Score AP Multiple Choice Quizzes in groups
  2. Continue scoring rhetorical analysis

HW:  Memoir Project

Thursday

  1. Turn in Memoir Project
  2. AP Prompt:  Singer Solution to World Poverty (Group Project)
  3. Brainstorm list for Argument Essay

Friday

  1. AP Timed Writing

 

HW:  Analyze a passage for author's purpose

Week of March 1

AP Language and Composition
Week of March 1

Monday
Discuss SPAM3
AP Timed Writing 

HW: Rewrite Lincoln Essay-Due Thursday
Must use the following rhetorical devices in your rewrite: SPAM3
 1 Simile
 1 Personification
 1 Hyphenated Adjective
 1 Sentence using the "Magic 3 Trick" (aka "parallelism")
Underline each device


Tuesday
Review TAKS Strategies
Return AP Timed Writings with Scoring Guide, Rangefinders, and Reader's Comments

Wednesday
TAKS Test

HW:  Finish rewriting Lincoln Essay (if needed)- DUE TOMORROW

Thursday
Peer Scoring-- Lincoln Essay
Multiple Choice Quiz

Friday
Rewrite Lincoln essay (Introduction and first paragraph)

Week of March 8

Monday

  1. Turn in Lincoln Rewrite
  2. Introduce Synthesis Essay and practice 15 reading time.
  3. Activity:  Making sources talk to each other
  4. Memorization Project

HW:  Read synthesis prompt.  Write introductory paragraph and first body paragraph. Read from "In the Country" and from "The Death of a Pig" and complete the author's purpose handout.

Tuesday

  1. Turn in synthesis essay and author's purpose handout.
  2. Discuss Adversity Essay (moving from "listing" to "narrative")
  3. Discuss "In the Country" and "The Death of a Pig"

HW:  Rewrite Introduction and first paragraph of Adversity essay.  Read "Women's Suffrage" essay by Susan B. Anthony and "The Use of Adverbs" and complete the author's purpose handout.

Wednesday

  1. Turn in Adversity rewrite and author's purpose handout.
  2. AP Timed Writing (This will count as the writing portion of your nine week exam)

HW:  Tomorrow we will have our nine week's test.  There is nothing to study except strategies from 5 Steps to a 5 for taking the multiple choice portion of the exam.

Thursday

  1. Nine Week Exam 

HW:  Read Francis Bacon essay "Of Studies" and complete author's purpose handout

Friday

  1. Discuss "Of Studies" and turn in Author's Purpose handout.
  2. Analyze Multiple Choice Questions from exam--Defend your answers.

 

No homework over Spring Break except to work on your memorization project.

When we return, I am trusting that you will be ready to go as we wrap up the final trek to the AP exam.  We have worked very hard this year, but we still have much to do.  

For those of you who have been faithful to complete all of the assignments, THANK YOU!!!  For those of you have been late, lazy, or careless, I am done with accommodations and leniency, so I encourage you to get yourself together and finish well.  

 

 

Week of March 22

Monday

 

Journal:   "Write about the American Dream?  What is it and what does it mean to you?  What are your dreams for the future?" . . ."If money was not an issue…What effect would wealth have upon the dreams that you wrote about earlier?" 

Listen to "The Declaration of Independence"

Analyze the "Declaration of Independence" in groups; write syllogisms

The Great Gatsby Project-Dialectical Journal- DUE APRIL 13

Test over Great Gatsby on THURSDAY, APRIL 15

 

Assertion Blog

From Monday, March 22 to April 29 , we will be creating an "Assertion Blog." This blog will consist of using the quote, reading or visual image provided from which you will clearly explain the author or artist's claim. Once you have stated the claim, you must defend, challenge or qualify the assertion noting any complexities of the issue and identifying any possible objections to the author or artist's point of view.

Below are the dates blogs will be posted and responses are due.  Post must be made no later than 4 p.m. on the date due otherwise late points will be incurred.

POSTED RESPONSE DUE DATES

Thursday, March 18

Thursday, March 25

Thursday, April 1

Thursday, April 8

Thursday, April 15

Thursday, April 22

Thursday, April 29

 

(If you do not have access to a computer at home, please see me. NO EXCUSES WILL BE ACCEPTED.  IF YOUR INTERNET IS DOWN, YOU ARE STILL REPONSIBLE FOR COMPLETING THE ASSIGNMENT ON THE DAY IT IS DUE.  YOU WILL JUST HAVE TO PROBLEM SOLVE!)

 

HW :  Read and annotate Elizabeth Cady Stanton's "The Declaration of Sentiments" in 50 Essays.  Note the similarities and differences between this text and "The Declaration of Independence."   How is the "Declaration of Independence used by the suffragists? Read and annotate "Another View of Hester".   How does her plight as a woman reflect Elizabeth Cady Stanton's "The Declaration of Sentiments"?

 

 Ongoing Project :  Begin The Great Gatsby and dialectical journal

Tuesday

Finish analyzing "The Declaration of Independence" (Questions)

Discuss Stanton's "The Declaration of Sentiments" and "Another View of Hester"

Writing Assignment:   Use the Declaration of Independence as a model and write your own declaration of independence.   Consider the following:

  • Who has sovereignty over your life?
  • How are your rights being violated?
  • What action must be taken?
  • What are you willing to sacrifice for your independence?

 

HW :  Finish your own declaration independence- DUE   THURSDAY; Annotate Synthesis Prompt ; Read "Where I Lived and What I Lived For" by Thoreau in 50 Essays and complete author's purpose handout-DUE THURSDAY write THREE higher level questions for inner/outer circle discussion-- DUE   THURSDAY .  

 

Ongoing Project :  Continue The Great Gatsby and dialectical journal

 

First Assertion Journal Due Thursday!

 

Wednesday

Timed Writing

 

HW: Finish your own declaration independence-Due THURSDAY; Read and annotate "Where I Lived and What I Lived For" by Thoreau in 50 Essays ; finish Author's Purpose Handout for TOMORROW .  

 

Ongoing Project :  Continue The Great Gatsby and dialectical journal

 

First Assertion Journal Due Thursday!

 

Thursday  

Discuss The American Dream /Introduce the 1920s and The Great Gatsby  

 

HW:   Read and annotate MLK's "I Have a Dream Speech" and make note of the rhetorical devices used in the speech. Fill out Author's Purpose Worksheet as you read.

 

ASSERTION JOURNAL DUE BY 4:00 P.M. TODAY

Friday  

Introduce Rhetorical Devices:   synchises and chiasmus

View "The Sanctuary"

Group Discussion:   Analyzing rhetorical devices in MLK's Speech (Contrasting Imagery)

 

HW:   W rite an essay that describes your personal American Dream OR using the reflective style of Thoreau, write your own philosophical essay entitled "Where I Live, and What I Live For"(note present tense) .  


What is your personal American dream?   Some say, that the American Dream has become the pursuit of material prosperity-that people work more hours to get bigger cars, fancier homes, the fruits of prosperity for their families-but have less time to enjoy their prosperity.   Others say that the American Dream is beyond the grasp of the working poor who must work two jobs to insure their family's survival.   Yet others look toward a new American Dream with less focus on financial gain and more emphasis on living a simple, fulfilling life.


Thomas Wolfe said, ". . .to every man regardless of his birth, his shining, golden opportunity. . .the right to live, to work , to be himself, and become whatever thing his manhood and his vision can combine to make him."


Essay Requirements:

Typed, 12 Point, Times New Roman

1 to 11/2 page length

MLA Format

Choose THREE rhetorical devices of your choosing to include in your writing.   Underline each device used (i.e. alliteration, parallelism, repetition, rhetorical question, allusion, etc.)

1.  Complete rhetorical analysis of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech using handout and bring to class on Monday.

Ongoing Project :   Continue The Great Gatsby and Dialectical Journal/Memorization Project

 

Next Assertion Journal Due on Thursday, March 25

The Great Gatsby Chapters 1-3 MUST BE READ BY TUESDAY, March 30  

 


 

"

Week of March 29

Monday

  1. Turn in MLK Analysis and Author's Purpose HO
  2. Review for Mock AP Exam on Thursday

Tuesday

  1. Senior Course Selection

Wednesday

  1. Continue review for Mock AP Exam

Thursday

Mock AP Language and Composition Exam

Friday

No School

 

Happy Easter!

 

 

Week of April 5

 

AP Language and Composition

Week of April 5, 2010  

Monday

1.   MEMORIZATION PROJECT DUE

2.   Pass out AP Multiple Choice Exam and Answer Documents and give instructions for corrections.

3.   Introduce Appositives

 

(You will have tonight and tomorrow night to read this essay; however tomorrow night you have a writing assignment, so at least read half or more of the essay tonight so that you will not be so overwhelmed tomorrow night.)

 

HW: Read and annotate "I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read" by Francine Prose. Download and print questions from website and complete appositives assignment-not due until THURSDAY. YOU WILL NEED THE QUESTIONS LATER IN THE WEEK SO BRING THEM TO CLASS ON THURSDAY.

Complete test corrections by doing the following FOR EACH QUESTION:

  1. Write down your original answer choice (the letter only) and give reason you chose that answer
  2. Write down what answer you think is correct and explain the reason for your choice

TEST CORRECTIONS ARE DUE WEDNESDAY

 Assertion Journal Due Thursday by 4 p.m.

Ongoing Project :  Continue The Great Gatsby and dialectical journal.  DUE NEXT MONDAY. Quiz over GG Ch. 1-6 TOMORROW.  

Tuesday  

1.   Quiz over GG. Ch.  1-6

2.   GG Literature Circle Discussion

 

HW : Read and finish annotating "I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read" by Francine Prose, make a list of the books she mentions that you have read.  Choose one book from the list that you have read.  Do you agree with her assertion about the book?  Defend or challenge her assertion in a ONE page essay.  DUE THURSDAY.  

Finish test corrections if needed--Due Tomorrow.

Assertion Journal Due Thursday by 4 p.m.

Ongoing Project:  Continue The Great Gatsby and dialectical journal.  DUE NEXT MONDAY.

Wednesday  

1.   Introduce "The Documentary as Rhetorical Argument" Project; choose groups-PRESENTATIONS DUE ON APRIL 20

2.   Discuss analysis of Mock AP Exam Multiple Choice

 

HW :  Read and annotate Emerson's "From Education." Create a dialectical journal and record at least 6 quotes (paying particular attention to his arguments) and interpret them. JOURNAL DUE FRIDAY (MUST BE READ AND ANNOTATED FOR DISCUSSION ON THURSDAY) 

Thursday

1.   Turn in argument essay over "I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read"

2.   Read "Failing Reports on US Schools"

3.   Group Close Analysis of "I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read" and "From Education."

 

HW: Finish Emerson Essay Dialectical Journal

  Ongoing Project :  Continue The Great Gatsby and dialectical journal.  DUE NEXT MONDAY.

 

Friday

1.   TURN IN dialectical journal from Emerson Essay

2.   Continue group close readings over Education Essays

 

HW:  Read and annotate "Conversation: Focus on the American High School"

  • Horace Mann, from Report of the Massachusetts Board of Education  
  • Leon Botstein, High School, an Institution Whose Time Has Passed 
  • Todd Gitlin, from The Liberal Arts in an Age of Info-Glut 
  • David S. Broder, A Model for High Schools
  • Floyd Norris, U.S. Students Fare Badly in International Survey of Math Skills (includes table)
  • Norman Rockwell, Spirit of Education (painting)

 

Finish reading book and complete Dialectic Journal over The Great Gatsby-- Due on TUESDAY, APRIL 13 . GG  MAJOR TEST on THURSDAY, APRIL 15.

 

Due Wednesday--Test Corrections

Due Thursday--Assertion Journal; "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" one page essay and appositives exercise.

Due Friday--Emerson Dialectical Journal


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Week of April 12

GG Dialectical Journal Due Tuesday, April 1 3.  Your journal will be used to write a rhetorical analysis of The Great Gatsby on Thursday, April 15 in addition to multiple choice questions.

Bring copies of "I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Ready" and from Education by Emerson on MONDAY.

Monday

  1. AP Multiple Choice Quiz
  2. Grammar:  Appositives and Zeugma
  3. Rhetorical Devices Packet--Due next MONDAY
  4. Rhetorical Analysis of Emerson and Prose

HW:  Begin Rhetorical Device Packet--Zeugma; finish GG Dialectical Journal

Tuesday

  1. Discuss Synthesis Essay--Tips and Tricks to Improve Your Score
  2. Rhetorical Device:  Synechdoche/Metonymy
  3. Continue Rhetorical Analysis of Emerson and Prose

HW:  Rhetorical Device Packet--Synecdoche/Metonymy; read and annotate synthesis sources; bring to class tomorrow.

Wednesday

  1. AP Timed Writing

HW:  Rhetorical Device Packet--Parenthesis/Apostrophe; read and annotate passage; fill out Author's Purpose HO and answer multiple choice questions

Thursday

  1. Check Multiple Choice Questions
  2. The Great Gatsby Test

HW:  Rhetorical Device Packet--Epithet/Asyndeton/Polysyndeton; read and annotate passage; fill out Author's Purpose HO and answer multiple choice questions

Friday

  1. Check Multiple Choice Questions
  2. Argument Essay--Tips and Tricks to Improving Your Score
  3. Begin Analyzing a Documentary Film as Rhetorical Argument

HW:  Rhetorical Device Packet: Parallelism/Chaismus/Anadiplosis/Conduplicatio/Epistrophe/Anaphora; read and annotate passage; fill out Author's Purpose HO and answer multiple choice questions

Week of April 19

Documentary Film Rhetorical Analysis Due on Monday, May 17th

Monday

  1. Finish watching "Twenty-Two Minutes"
  2. Analyze film using rhetorical strategies
  3. AP Multiple Choice Quiz--Defend Answers

Tuesday

  1. Tips and Tricks for Writing the Rhetorical Analysis
  2. Group Activity:  Analyze AP Prompts for rhetorical devices

Wednesday

  1. Review Elements of Argument
  2. Group Activity:  Continue AP Prompt Analysis 

Thursday

  1. AP Timed Writing:  Rhetorical Analysis

Friday

  1. AP Multiple Choice Quiz--Defend Answers
  2. Peer Score Rhetorical Analysis using Range Finders

 


Week of April 26

Documentary Film Rhetorical Analysis Due on Monday, May 17th

Monday

  1. Work on PRIs and Argumentative Essay List
  2. Handout AP Language and Composition Review Packet--Due May 3

Tuesday

  1. TAKS Review
  2. Afternoon Classes:  Review Fallacies and Elements of Argumentation

Wednesday

  1. TAKS Math
  2. Afternoon Classes:  Review Organizational Strategies for Writing

Thursday

  1. TAKS Science
  2. Afternoon Classes:  Continue to Review Organization Strategies for Writing 

Friday

  1. TAKS Social Studies
  2. Afternoon Classes:  AP Multiple Choice Review

 

Week of May 3

Documentary Film Rhetorical Analysis Due on Monday, May 17th

Monday

  1. Go over AP Lang and Comp Review Packet
  2. Tips and Tricks for the Argumentative Essay

Tuesday

  1. Group Activity:  Analyze AP Argumentative Essay Prompts
  2. Present analysis to class

Wednesday

  1. AP Timed Writing:  Argumentative Essay

Thursday

  1. Score Argumentative Essays:  Rangefinders and Readers Comments
  2. Review elements of Satire

Friday

  1. Continue review of elements of satire
  2. Group Activity:  Analyze AP Satire Prompt 

 

Documentary Film Rhetorical Analysis Due on Monday, May 17th

 

Week of May 10

Documentary Film Rhetorical Analysis Due on Monday, May 17th

 Monday

  1. Rhetorical Bingo

 

Tuesday

  1. Rhetorical Bingo

 

Wednesday

AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION TEST

 

Thursday

Introduce and watch "Of Mice and Men"

 

Friday

Introduce and watch "Of Mice and Men"

 

Documentary Film Rhetorical Analysis Due on Monday, May 17th

 

 

 

Week of May 17

Monday

  1. Finish watching "Of Mice and Men"
  2. Discuss Steinbeck and the American Dream

Tuesday

  1. Begin Documentary Film Analysis Presentations

Wednesday

  1. Continue Documentary Film Analysis Presentations

Thursday

  1. Continue Documentary Film Analysis Presentations

Friday

  1. Finish Documentary Film Analysis Presentations
Week of May 24

Monday

  1. Introduce Poetry for AP Literature

Tuesday

  1. Continue introduction to Poetry for AP Literature

Wednesday

  1. Wrap up Introduction to Poetry for AP Literature
  2. Review for test (will cover Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, Rhetorical Devices, and Fallacies)

Thursday

  1. Nine Weeks Exam and Last Day of School